EnergyWatch

Germany takes unprecedented step to support heat-stricken energy sector

In an attempt to prevent a dramatic shortage in electricity production in central Germany, authorities have now authorized the usage of unusually warm river water to cool power plants. In Scandinavia, the prospect of rain provides a little room to breathe in a strained energy sector.

Photo: EDF

The dramatic heat and dry summer continues to pressure the energy sector in Northern Europe. As EnergyWatch was able to report last week, the long period of drought and little wind has led to record-high prices in the Scandinavian energy market and has put pressure on the nuclear energy sector in Germany, France and Sweden.

Since then, the heat has only grown more intense and now the German authorities have employed unprecedented initiatives in order to keep the energy sector running. Thus, the state of Baden-Württemberg has announced that it has received approval from the federal authorities to continue using river water for the cooling of the state's power plants. The approval comes even though river water in Baden-Württemberg has exceeded 28 degrees celcius, far above the 25 degrees celcius that are usually considered the maximum temperature for cooling nuclear power plants and large coal-fired power plants.

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